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Adverbs “Since and For” Grammar Review Video

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Video English LessonsAdverbs “Since and For” Grammar Review.

The adverbs “Since and For,” are just two of the many adverbs used in the English language.

The most common tenses these adverbs are used in, are the “Perfect Tenses.” “Since,” is followed by a specific time. “For,” is used before a time expression.

“Since and For,” are used to form questions, positives, and negative statements.

These adverbs can also be used in other ways as well.

Here are Some Examples:

Present Perfect Simple and Continuous tenses:

Has she been here since Tuesday?

Yes, she has, or No, she hasn’t.

Have you been here for twenty minutes?

Yes, I have, or No, I haven’t.

Have you been cooking since noon?

No, I haven’t, or Yes, I have.

Other uses with Since and For:

Can you go to the shop since I can’t?

Of course I can!

Can you carry my book for me?

Yes, I would be happy to!

Since I am not working, could we go to the beach?

Yes, let’s go!

Vocabulary Bank Definitions.

Adverb: Words that modify or describe “verbs, adjectives, and adverbs.”

Tuesday: The day of the week after Monday.

Noon: The twelfth hour of the day or lunch time.

Shop: A place to buy something.

Beach: A place with sand next to the sea, ocean or river.

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Since and For Everyday Dialog.

The most common tenses
these adverbs are used
are the perfect tenses.
There are many more
tenses that we can
use these in as well.
It’s quite common
for these two adverbs
to be used in combination.
Just like other adverbs
in English, sometimes we
use one adverb to ask
a question and another one
to commonly answer.
Positive, negative etc.
Since is followed by
a specific time.
Have you been here
since eight o’clock
this morning?
Yes I have and I am
still here now. So.
When we use the word
since, it means from
one point in time in
the past and also
goes into the present
moment of speech. So.
I’ve been here.
I’ve worked here.
I’ve eaten here.
Since a certain time. So.
We use “since” for a
specific point in time.
And this is one
of the instances
where we refer to
an exact time with
“present perfect.”
But remember!
It must still be true
at the moment of speech.
“For” is used with a
time expression. So.
I’ve been here
for three hours.
I’ve been here
for two hours.
And in this context,
once again, I’m talking
about a period of time.
And it must still
be true now.
I’ve worked here for
so many years.
Hey! How long have
you worked at that Factory?
Well, I worked at that
factory for ten years
and I still do.
This is another use
of present perfect.
“Since and For” are used to form
questions, positive and
negative statements.
These adverbs can also
be used in other tenses
as well as perfect.
Here are a few examples
for you to study with
present perfect tenses.
Has she been here
since Tuesday?
Yes she has or
no she hasn’t.
Maybe it’s a colleague
or someone that you know.
Maybe someone next door.
Maybe a neighbor
something like that.
Hey! Has she been
here since that time?
Yes, she has been
here since Tuesday.
Last Wednesday.
Something like that.
And she still is here.
Have you been here
for the last 20 minutes?
Have you been here
for twenty minutes?
Yes I have.
No I haven’t.
Well, please,
I’m sorry for being
late to our meeting.
I didn’t mean to keep you
waiting for 20 minutes. So.
Again, I’m here now.
Have you been here
for twenty minutes?
Yes I have.
I arrived twenty
minutes ago.
Have you been
cooking since noon?
No I haven’t
or yes I have.
It’s a special holiday.
Something like that. Maybe.
Hey, have you been
cooking since noon?
It’s five o’clock now.
Yes! I’ve been cooking
since 12 o’clock noon
and I’m still
cooking now. So.
I have been cooking
for five hours.
Other uses with
“since and for” are.
Can you go to the
shop since I can’t?
Yes, of course.
Why not?
Of course I can. So.
Here’s another use
with the word since.
And it’s not used
for a certain
point in time.
Can you carry my
book for me?
Yes! I would be
happy too! So.
Can you carry
my book for. Yes?
It’s used much differently
in this context.
Since I’m not working,
Could we go to the beach?
Yes! Let’s go!
“Since” it means as a
result or because of.
Something like that.
Here are some
word definitions.
Check your dictionary
for more.
What’s an adverb?
Well, an adverb is
a word that describes
or modifies verbs,
adjectives and adverbs.
“Tuesday”
What is Tuesday?
Well, Tuesday is
the second day.
Ah, let’s see, Monday, Tuesday
If you live in
Eastern Europe,
Tuesday is the second
day of the week.
If you live in
the United States.
Tuesday is the third
day of the week.
Sunday, Monday, Tuesday.
American English.
Monday, Tuesday is
used in Eastern Europe.
“Noon”
The twelfth hour of
the day or lunchtime.
I often say 12:00 noon, so
someone understands me
a little bit better.
As where sometimes
in English we say
the same thing twice.
In a very simple way.
What time is it?
Well, it’s 12:00.
Uh, wait! You’re on the
other side of the planet!
Is it 12:00 midnight
or 12:00 morning?
I forget.
Well it’s 12:00 noon.
Oh! Lunchtime.
“Shop”
A place to buy something.
Or “to shop” is an action.
To buy. To look for.
Something at a place
that sells something.
“Beach”
Hey! What’s a beach?
Well it’s a place with
sand next to the sea,
ocean or river.