Adverbs Intermediate

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Adverbs!

Adverbs ‘Ever and Never’ American English

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Adverbs ‘Just and Yet’ American English

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Adverbs ‘Slowly and Carefully’ American English

Adverbs Slowly and Carefully American English from Billgreen54 on Vimeo.

Adverbs ‘Quickly and Fast’ American English

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Adverbs ‘Since and For’ American English

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Adverbs ‘Recently and Already’ American English

Adverbs Recently and Already American English from Billgreen54 on Vimeo.

Adverbs ‘Rarely and Seldom’ American English

Adverbs Rarely and Seldom American English from Billgreen54 on Vimeo.

Adverbs ‘Usually and Hardly Ever’ American English

Adverbs Usually and Hardly Ever American English from Billgreen54 on Vimeo.

Adverbs ‘Always and Never’ American English

Adverbs Always and Never American English from Billgreen54 on Vimeo.

Adverbs ‘Still and Lately’ American English

Adverbs Still and Lately American English from Billgreen54 on Vimeo.

The adverbs “Ever and Never” are just two of the many adverbs used in the English language. The most common tenses these adverbs are used in, are the “Perfect Tenses”. It is quite common for these two adverbs to be used in combination. “Ever” is often used to form questions and negatives about the past. “Never” is used for negative responses. When used in “Perfect Tenses”, we never refer to exact time. These adverbs can also be used in simple tenses as well. Below are a few examples to study.

Examples:

Present perfect tense:

Q: Have you ever been to Mexico? A: No, I haven’t or Yes, I have.

Q: Have you ever eaten sushi? A: Yes, I have or No I haven’t.

Q: Have you ever ridden a motorcycle? A: No, I haven’t or Yes, I have.

Present simple tense:

Q: Do you ever read? No, I never read or Yes, I do.

Q: Do you ever dream of the past? No, I never do or Yes, I do.

Q: Do you ever eat pizza on Fridays? Yes, I do or No, I don’t.

Vocabulary Bank

Combination: Two or more put together.

Mexico: A country south of The USA.

Sushi: A Japanese food.

Motorcycle: A motorized form of transportation.

Read: To study a written article.

Dream: To have experiences while we sleep.

Pizza: Food prepared with dough and toppings.

The adverb “Always” is often used with the present simple tense. It is normally placed before the main verb. When it is used with the verb “To be”, “Always” goes after. The same is true with “Never”. “Always” is used to refer to daily events. “Action and Stative verbs” are used. Compare “Always and Never” as complete opposites. These adverbs are also commonly used with the “Perfect Tenses”.

Examples:

Present simple.

Q: Is she always at home? A: Yes, she is or No, she is never there.

Q: Do they always swim on Saturdays? A: Yes, they do or No, they don’t.

Q: Does he always walk to work? A: No, never! or Yes, he does.

Other uses with “Always and Never”:

Q: Have you always gone to the park on Saturday? A: Yes, I have!

Q: Are you always happy when you wake up? A: No, never!

Q: Do you always sing in the shower? Yes, I always do that!

Vocabulary Bank

Adverb: Words that modify or describe “verbs, adjectives and adverbs”.

Daily events: Things we do every day.

Action verb: Describes an activity we can watch as it happens.

Stative verb: Describes a static or unchanging event.

Shower: An event that should take place daily.

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