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“Indirect Request and Offer” Grammar Review Audio


“Indirect Requests and Offers.”

There are many ways to ask for things in English. From simple to complicated, English can be polite and impolite!

Finding ways to bridge grammar from an elementary stage of study to higher levels can make learning English fun!

At the earliest stages of our language learning journey, we learn ways to simply communicate.

At the higher levels, we learn how to articulate our thoughts in a more common and polite way. At the higher levels, we have many more methods of communication compared to the earliest stages.

Indirect requests and offers are at the top of the list for politeness.

Here are “Indirect Request,” Present Simple Examples.

I would like some coffee! Indirect request without contraction.

I’d like some coffee! Indirect request with contraction.

I would like to watch a movie! Indirect request without contraction.

I’d like to watch a movie! Indirect request with contraction.

“Polite Offer,” Present Simple Examples.

Would you like some coffee? Polite offer at the table.

Would you like more dessert? Polite offer at the table.

“Polite Offer,” For The Future Examples.

Would you like to watch a movie tonight? Offer for the future.

Would you like to visit the park tomorrow? Offer for the future.

Do not confuse “Would you like” with “Do you like.” “Would you like” is an expression used for “one time offers.”

“Do you like” is used to ask if you like something everyday or all the time. Examples with present simple might be “Do you like reading?” or “Do you like your job?”

Read Indirect Request and Offer Text.

Watch Request and Offer Video.

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Indirect Question Everyday Dialog.

Indirect questions and offers,
are at the top of
the list for politeness.
So. “Indirect request”
and we’re going to talk about
that in a minute.
Have fun with this subject.
With this topic and
please ask your teacher
to work with you.
And I don’t care what level
you’re learning English at.
This is very.
This is a very important subject.
And using the
the idea of bridging grammar
or grammar bridge,
is a great way
to move up that ladder
to proficiency
in the English language.
Here are some
“indirect requests”
in present simple.
I would like some coffee!
Now, I didn’t look at
someone and say:
“give me coffee.”
I could say:
Can I have some coffee?
Could I have some coffee?
Those are all “direct requests.”
Now, this one!
“I would like
some coffee!”
Now. You notice I didn’t
contract “I would.”
I’m gonna do that in the next
slide, but.
“I would like some coffee.”
If somebody said to you,
“What would you like
with breakfast?”
“The juice or coffee?” Well.
I “would like” some coffee.
That would be a great way to
answer and it would be
a great way to ask
someone for coffee.
Here’s the contraction.
“I’d like some
coffee, please!
Someone!” You see?
Instead of saying;
Give me coffee.
or, will you “give me”
coffee. Right now! Right?
Or instead of saying;
“Give me” coffee. You see?
“I’d like some coffee!”
Again, going from that
lower level to a
higher level of English.
“I would like to watch a movie!”
That’s an “indirect request”
without a contraction.
“I’d like to watch a movie!”
Somebody would.” You see?
I might follow that up
with another statement.
“What would you like
to do tonight?”
Someone might ask you that.
Maybe it’s an advanced
speaker of English or
someone who is
has English as
their native language.
So. In this case.
I’d like to watch
a movie somebody! Or.
“Yes, I would like to watch.”
or “I’d like to watch a
movie tonight!” Let’s go!
Here is a polite offer
in present simple.
“Would you like
some coffee?”
Now. You see how I
turn the table?
Now. It is an offer.
“Would you like some coffee?”
Yes! I’d, I would
love some coffee!
or “Yes, I would like
some coffee.
Please.”
Very, very polite!
“Would you like more dessert?”
So, you’re at the
dinner table.
You had dinner already
and the person who
is hosting you or
maybe it’s at home,
husband, wife,
somebody says;
Hey! “Would you like” some more dessert?
And of course,
you’re going to say:
Yes! Polite offer
for the future.
“Hey! Would you like to
watch a movie tonight?
Now. If I just said to you
and we hadn’t talked about time
and I’m sitting by the
television, right?
Or the monitor.
Hey! Would you like
to watch a movie?
It means, right now, doesn’t it?
Now. Maybe, it’s
in the morning.
Maybe it’s in the afternoon.
And I said; Hey,
Hey, would you like
to watch a movie tonight?
I don’t have plans yet.
Something like that.
Definitely, for the future.
“Tonight” is an adverb.
I put a time
expression in there.
And this statement is
“present simple
for the future.”
“Would you like to
visit the park tomorrow?”
Again, “tomorrow” is an adverb
and we’re talking
about tomorrow. So.
This is an offer
for the future.
If I just said;
Hey! would you like
to visit the park?
And what it really means
is “right now” unless
you and I understand
what period of time
we are talking about.
Don’t confuse,
“Would you like?” with
“Do you like?”
Now. We’re getting into
this “grammar bridge”
or, how we
“bridge grammar.” Bridge.
How we connect
one level, one phrase,
one type of grammar
to another
to help you speak
better English. So.
“Would you like?”
and “Do you like?”
“Would you like”
is an expression used
for a one-time offer.
Would you like to go
to the cinema tonight?
One time.
Would you like to have
some pizza, right now?
Would you like to have some
coffee with your dessert
right now? You see?
That’s a one-time offer.
“Do you like?”
Is used to ask if you like
something every day
or all the time.
Hey! Do you like pizza?
Yes I do!
Every Friday we go out!
Hey! Do you like
exercising in the morning?
Yes, of course,
we go everyday!