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What are “Quantifiers and Partitives?” Grammar Review

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What are Quantifiers and Partitives?

A quantifier is a word or phrase used before a noun or pronoun to refer to a quantity or amount of something.

Quantifiers are used to give more information. We use these words and phrases with countable and uncountable nouns. With a quantifier, just about all nouns are countable in English!

Simple quantifiers used with countable nouns include words like “Many, few, several etc.”

Quantifiers used with both countable and uncountable nouns are “All, enough, a lot of, some, any etc.”

Partitives are words or phrases used to refer to part of something. In other words a partial quantity. Partitives are used to refer to both countable and uncountable nouns.“A glass of water, a can of soda, a slice of bacon, a room full of people.”

Often, we use a container or form of measurement in partitive construction. This grammar review is a brief and partial explanation of quantifiers.

Here are “Partitive,” Examples.

I just bought a pound of sugar at the supermarket!

Here is a bouquet of flowers for your birthday!

Would you like a cup of coffee now or later?

May I get you a bottle of water from the fridge?

“Countable,” Quantifier Examples.

Could you buy a few apples at the shop?

We have several cats on the farm!

How many apples do we have at home now?

“Uncountable,” Quantifier Examples.

Could I have just a little sugar for my coffee?

May I offer you a bit of my chocolate cake?

Our neighbor doesn’t have much money!

The main idea with quantifiers is to recognize ways to refer to nouns.

Ask your teacher for a further explanation and examples to practice with.

Read Quantifiers and Partitives Text.

Quantifiers & Partitives Dialog.

A quantifier
is a word or phrase
used before a noun or
pronoun and they
refer to a quantity or
amount of something.
We learn quantifiers at the
earliest stages of English.
We have some examples
to show you here.
Quantifiers are used
to give more information.
We use these
words and phrases with
countable and
uncountable nouns.
With a quantifier
just about all nouns in
English are countable.
Simple quantifiers
used with countable nouns
include: “many,”
“few,” “several,” etc.
Quantifiers used with both
countable and uncountable, are:
“all,” “enough,” “a lot of,”
“some,” “any” and “more.”
“Partitives” are words
or phrases,
used to refer to just
part of something
makes sense, doesn’t it?
“Partitives.” Part.
We use those to talk about
part of something not
the entire but,
it’s not always exactly true,
and I’ll show you why.
In other words.
A partial quantity.
“Partitives” are used
to refer to both, countable
and uncountable nouns.
Like: a glass of water.
a can of soda,
a slice of bacon,
a room full of people. So.
Let’s take the last one.
A room full of people.
Well. People, person, people,
that’s a noun. Right?
Its countable.
There’s one person,
there are three people,
four people,
five people, but
when we use
a Partitive,
we’re talking about
a group or part of something.
A glass of water. Right?
How do we talk about water?
“Water” is not countable.
Right? It’s an uncountable noun,
but not exactly, because
if we refer to it
in the container,
a bottle of water,
a glass of water.
Something like that.
Then it becomes countable.
Often we use a
container or measurement. You see.
This grammar review is
a brief explanation
of quantifiers.
Here are a few examples
and be sure to ask your teacher
to explain this
a little bit further.
This topic is a great topic
especially for early
learners of English.
Here are some Partitive
of examples.
“Yeah. I just bought a
pound of sugar at
the supermarket.” So.
It could be a pound of,
it could be a bag of,
it could be a can of,
a container of,
and this is how we
talk about items
that are often uncountable.
Here is a bouquet
of flowers. So.
A bouquet. How do we
describe many flowers.
I could say. Well. I have
twelve or thirteen,
fifteen flowers
in this bouquet. Right?
Or. I could say:
“Hey, here is a bouquet.
I don’t know how many
flowers are in there. So.
We often do that
when we don’t know
exactly how many.
“Hey. Would you like
a cup of coffee,
now or later?”
A cup of coffee.
We learn at early stages
that coffee is not countable,
because it’s a liquid, right?
But if I said:
“Hey, we have five people
coming to our home today.
They’re coming over
for breakfast.
Let’s make
five cups of coffee.
So. In this context,
we’re saying,
we’re using the number five
to talk about
coffee, aren’t we?
“May I get you a bottle of
water from the fridge?”
So. Water is not
countable either. Right?
We learned that the early
stages, but it is
countable, if we refer
to the container,
that it comes in.
Here are some countable
quantifier examples.
“Hey. Could you buy
a few apples at
the shop?” Now.
Technically fruit.
The word “fruit.”
“Fruit” is a collective noun,
and then under that goes
apples and bananas
and oranges and so forth.
So. Fruit as
as a noun is a collective, but
apples are countable.
Often we talk about things
that we can put in our hand
or we can see physically
are countable.
Some items many
nouns in English are
countable and uncountable.
We have several
cats on the farm. So.
Several, how many is that?
I’m not sure.
probably more than two,
that might be a couple.
Several could be
three or more.
“How many apples
do we have at home now?”
Well. We have three
or four apples, let’s buy
some more.” So.
Many in this context
is your quantifier.
Here are some uncountable
quantifier examples.
“Hey. Could I have just a little?”
So. Just a little.
“Just” as an adverb.
I could say:
“Hey, could I have a little
sugar for my coffee?”
The problem with
“a little” is, how much is that?
Do you know how much
“a little” is?
If I put an adverb
in there.
“Could I have just a little?”
You see. So.
When we say “just”
that’s your adverb
and it used use it’s used to
to either increase or
decrease the strength,
or the let’s say,
to emphasize.
In this case sugar. Right?
“Hey. May I offer you
a bit of my chocolate
cake? It’s so tasty.” So.
“A bit of”
How much is that?
Well. We don’t know.
The idea is
that “a bit”
to you like a little,
to you might be this much,
or this much or
this much,
we don’t know.
It might be,
you know it might be
one cup,
it might be half a cup,
it might be
less than that,
we don’t know,
it’s all about you,
and that’s why we use
quantifiers like that.
“Hey. Our neighbor
doesn’t have much money.”
Well. “Much” that’s used
for uncountable, isn’t it?
And, technically, money
is not countable.
$1, $2, $3, $4,
those are countable. Right?
But “money” is also a
collective. So.
The way that I would
normally teach
this subject is
“money” as a collective,
and then under that,
you have one dollar,
five dollars,
ten dollars.
Something like that.
Those are countable,
but “money” is a collective.