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What is a Verb? Grammar Review


What is a Verb? Grammar Review all about verbs with Billgreen54. Online English lesson.

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What is a Verb? Grammar Review.

A Verb is one of “The Eight Parts” of the English language. A verb expresses an action, state or feeling. Action verbs express an activity we can watch or know it is happening. State or Stative verbs express a fact. Feeling verbs express senses.

Common feeling verbs are “Like, Love, Enjoy.” Most stative verbs are never used in the continuous tenses. Some common state verbs are “Have, get and see.” Every sentence in English must have a verb.

Here are Some Examples. What is a Verb? Grammar Review.

Action verbs are in bold type.

Do you dance?

Yes, I dance at the club on Fridays.

Is she running down the street?

Yes, she runs often!

Are you walking to work today?

No, I am riding my bicycle!

Stative verbs are in bold type. What is a Verb? Grammar Review.

Does it have a name?

Yes, my new dog’s name is Spot.

Do you live in London?

Yes, I do.

Who is he married to?

He is married to Sally.

Here is the vocabulary bank definitions.

Verb: Used for actions, states and feelings.

Activity: An action or movement.

Stative: Facts more than actions.

Sentence: As few as two words including a verb.

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What is a Verb? Grammar Review.

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Verb Everyday Dialog.

A verb expresses an action-
-state or a feeling.
So what’s an action?
Well. Run, jump, maybe even talk.
If you can see it, that’s an action. Right?
A state. Well, what is a state?
A state is more like a fact.
In other words.
Like. Like is in the English language.
Like is used at least seven-
-different ways in the English language.
If we use the word like.
Like is a state verb.
We have many state verbs.
And a state means more like a fact.
Not an action.
And also for feelings.
A lot of people don’t stop-
-and think about why-
-we use verbs for feelings.
But stop and think about it.
Like, love, enjoy.
Those are all verbs.
They’re not adjectives.
They’re verbs.
And we often use those-
-words to share our feelings.
Action verbs express an activity.
We just talk.
And usually you can see it. Yes?
You can see something happening-
-someone running, somebody walking.
Something like that.
State or stative verbs again-
-express a fact.
Feeling verbs express senses.
Common feeling verbs are-
-like love and enjoy. Right?
Most stative verbs are never-
-used in the continuous tenses.
One very common stative verb is have.
Have is a verb it’s a state verb.
It doesn’t describe an action.
It’s actually an empty verb. So.
An empty verb is a verb that-
-literally means nothing.
It has no single definition.
If we talk about a word like run. Right?
Run has a single definition.
I’m running down the street.
That’s literally not phrasal-
-idiomatic, etc. So.
Most stative verbs are never used-
-in the continuous tenses.
But I need to tell you.
That most grammar rules in-
-English, do have exceptions.
Some common state verbs.
There’s that one “Have”.
Get and see.
Get is a very common verb-
-in the English language.
So is “See”.
If I said right now “I see you”.
You don’t see anything moving. Right?
Literally. Right? So.
“See” is a state verb.
“Hear” is a state verb.
Listen.
To listen is a state verb.
Why?
Because you can’t see an action.
Every sentence in English-
-must have a verb.
Now remember!
In perfect English Perfect English.
If it’s a sentence it must have a verb.
The shortest sentence in English is.
“I am”.
“I” is a pronoun “am” is the verb “To Be”.
Right?
Ah, some action examples here.
Can you find the action verb? So.
Do you dance?
Hey! Do you dance?
My wife’s watching me.
By the way? [Laugh]
Would you like to go dancing tonight?
Okay! Let’s do it!
[Laugh] Do you dance?
Yes! I dance at the club on Fridays!
So. To dance, don’t forget-
-dance is also a noun.
I’m going to a dance Friday.
To dance.
Hey? Is she running down the street?
Yeah! She runs often! So!
Running is a verb. Right?
She runs often.
That’s a verb.
Are you walking?
Yes, I’m walking to work today.
Or no! I’m riding my bicycle.
So walking.
I can see that.
That’s an action verb. Right?
I am riding.
Riding is an action verb.
Here are a few stative verbs.
Now, can you find those?
Does it have a name?
Yes! My new dog’s name is spot.
Do, did, done.
Do is a state verb.
Why?
Because it doesn’t mean one thing.
And it’s a fact. Right?
Hey! Does it have a name?
Yes! My new dog’s name is spot.
So. “Is” the verb to be.
Am, Is, Are, Was, Were, Been. Right?
Is, am, is, are, the verb to be.
Is a state verb.
We use it many different ways.
In the English language.
Do you live in London?
Yes, I do.
“Live” is a state verb.
And “Do” is a state verb.
Who is he married to?
Well. He’s married to Sally. So.
“Is” again.
The verb “to be” is a state verb.
And that is used many different-
-ways in the English language.
Here are some common word definitions.
Do you know these words?
Verb.
Well, it’s used for actions-
-States and feelings. Right?
We just talked about that.
“Activity”
An action or movement.
Something we’re doing. Right?
We can usually see that.
Stative.
Facts more than actions.