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What are Movement Prepositions? Grammar Review Video


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What are Movement Prepositions?

Prepositions of movement and direction are used to refer to show movement from one place to another. Generally, movement prepositions follow a verb.

These are used to refer to specific or general places. Many movement prepositions and place prepositions are used universally in spoken English. Study prepositions in simple usage.

There may be or not be specific preposition rules. Prepositions are also commonly used with phrasal verbs. That is another subject. Keep your English study simple.

Here are Movement Preposition examples:

To, through, across, along, around, down, into, off, out of, past, towards.

To: Walk to, travel to, run to, jump to, climb to.

Through: Climb through, walk through, drive through, ride through.

Across: Stroll across the bridge, run across the field, walk across the street.

Along: Wander along the river, walk along the street.

Around: Run around the playground, walk around the yard.

Down: Go down the stairs, hike down the mountain.

Into: Walk into a room, pour coffee into my cup.

Off: Take off your shoes, get off the table, run off the stage.

Out of: Walk out of the park, climb out of the window.

Past: Run past the shop, walk past the corner.

Towards: Drive towards the store, walk towards the building.

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Movement Prepositions Everyday Dialog.

Prepositions of
movement and direction
are used to refer to
show movement
from one place to another.
Generally, movement
prepositions follow a verb.
These are used
to refer
to specific places
or general places.
Many movement prepositions
and place prepositions
are used universally
in spoken English.
Study prepositions
in simple usage first
because it’s the way
people communicate.
There may or may not be
specific preposition
rules in English.
Prepositions are also
commonly used
with phrasal verbs.
Here are some movement
preposition examples;
“to,” “through,” “across,”
“along,” “around,” “down,”
“into,” “off,” “out of,”
“past” and “towards.”
“To.” Walk to.
Travel to.
Run to.
Jump to.
Climb to.
It means “from,” “to.” right.
I am walking or
I will walk
or I walk every day.
I walk to work
every day.
Travel to.
I travel to
work every day.
I run to. You see?
“Through.”
Climb through.
Walk through.
Drive through.
Ride through.
Now “through” is used
often when there
are other areas
around us.
Think about a window.
Someone is climbing
through a window.
Someone is walking
through a room.
From one
part of the room
to the other
part of the room.
Maybe from the door
to the front door.
To another door.
Let’s say.
A tunnel.
I’m driving through
the tunnel, right now,
on the road. You see?
So. To walk through.
Drive through or
something like that.
Where we have objects
surrounding us in some way.
“Across.”
Stroll.
That means walk,
stroll across the bridge.
Run across the field.
Walk across the street.
“Across” generally means
we’re walking
from this place
or going from this
end to the other
and there is no
object around us.
In other words,
in this case, here,
run across
the field, Right?
So. We’re going
to run across
the field from one side
to the other side.
“Along.” “Wander.”
It means to
walk or to go somewhere
without a real
need or real
sense of urgency.
“Wander.” “Along.”
the river.
Walk along the street.
So. This doesn’t mean there’s
anything beside us.
It simply means that
we are walking
somewhere and there’s
some object
that we can help explain.
In other words, “In.”
In the first case here,
walking along
the river.
It might be that I’m
walking beside
the river as well.
“Around.”
Run around
the playground.
Walk around the yard.
Sometimes in British English
“round” is used.
Run “round” the playground.
Something like that.
But to run around the yard
may not be exactly all
the way around.
It just means that we’re
running without a real
sense of direction.
“Down.”
Go down the stairs.
Go up the stairs. You see?
Those are opposites. Right?
Hike down
the mountain.
Hike up
the mountain. So.
To go down.
To go up.
Are opposites.
These are. This is one
preposition learned at the
very early stages of English.
“Into.”
I’ve mentioned “into”
in other tutorials.
“Into,” is all about movement.
Walk into a room.
Pour coffee
into my cup. So.
“Hey! Where are you?”
Someone calls me
on the phone.
I am just
entering my home.
I am just
opening the door
and I am just
walking into the room.
Now, again, we talk about
coffee in a cup. Right?
Hey! Can I have some
more coffee?
Well, yes, you can!
Would you like
sugar with that?
No, I just want mine black.
In this case,
can you pour some?
Will you? Would you? Please!
Pour some coffee
into my cup. You see?
Into, is a preposition
of movement.
Many people will say,
“Please pour some coffee
in my cup.”
“In” is not
a preposition of
movement but often
we do that.
“In” is a preposition of place.
“Off.” “Hey!
take off your shoes!”
Get off the table.
Run off the stage. So.
Take off your shoes.
That’s a phrase, isn’t it?
It’s a phrasal verb.
“Take off” means remove.
“Get off” the table.
It means also
to remove
yourself from the table.
Run off the stage.
It means to leave
the stage. So.
These are all
phrasal verbs.
Very common in English
to use a verb
with a preposition.
“Out of.”
Walk “out of”
the park.
To climb out
of the window.
So. In this case,
it also means
“to leave.”
Hey! I am leaving
the park right now.
I’m walking out
of the park.
“To leave”
is a literal verb
and in this context,
I’m using
“to walk out of.”
That is a
phrase “out of.”
“Past.”
Run “past” the shop.
Walk past the corner. So.
Past, simply means
to walk
farther or further
than another
than an object
of some kind. So.
Hey! Let’s meet
by the shop.
Would be very
close to it. Or.
When you’re going
to the shop.
Walk just
past the shop
to the next building.
You see?
That might help
you a little bit
with the word “past.”
“Towards.”
Drive towards
the store.
Walk towards
the building.
Hey! Where are you
going right now?”
Well, I’m walking
towards the store.
I’ll be there in one minute.
You see? So.
To walk
towards means
to get closer.
To walk backwards. Yes?
Would be to leave. Yes?
Something like that.
In this context.
I walk towards means,
I’m getting closer and
closer and closer.
Hey! have fun
with prepositions.