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What are Personal Pronouns? Grammar Review Video

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Video English LessonsWhat are Personal Pronouns? Grammar Review.

First! What is a pronoun? A pronoun is a word that replaces a noun or noun phrase!

Personal pronouns refer to people!

“I, me, you, he, him, she, her, it, we, us, they, them, who!”

Why do we need pronouns? Pronouns are used for a few different reasons. Native English speakers often refer to a subject twice or more!

In other words, making a statement is often followed by another statement either to further explain or to reinforce a statement!

We use personal pronouns to refer to “Gender, eg: male, female, it.”

“Numbers, person or people, eg: first, second or third person.”

There are two types of personal pronouns: “Subjective,” and “Objective.”

This grammar review is a brief explanation of personal pronouns.

Here are Personal Pronoun Examples:

I would like some water please!

Sally said, you really must visit the new museum!

He congratulated me on my recent promotion!

Sally said she was going to the cinema later!

Where is the key? I can’t find it anywhere!

We could go to the beach this weekend!

They are coming for dinner tonight, aren’t they?

I can’t visit you on Saturday! I have to work!

You could visit me on Sunday, couldn’t you?

Have you seen Bob? He is usually at work by now!

Could you call Irene for me? She should be home by now!

The computer isn’t working now. It must be broken!

You and I could make the movie if we left now!

They will call anytime! What should I tell them?

Subject/object pronouns are “You, it, one.”

Subject pronouns are “I, you, he, she, it, we, they, one.”

Object pronouns are “Me, you, him, her, it, us, them, one.”

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Personal Pronouns Everyday Dialog.

Why do we need
pronouns anyway? Well.
Pronouns are used
for a number of reasons.
Native English speakers
often refer to a subject
twice or more.
So. It does get down to
trying to avoid
saying the same thing.
In other words.
Making a statement
is often followed by
another statement.
Either to explain
or to make it stronger.
We use personal pronouns
to refer to gender.
Boy, girl, male, female, it.
And numbers.
Person or people.
first, second, or
third person.
There are two types
personal pronouns.
“Subjective and objective.”
This grammar review is
just a brief explanation
for you to help you with
personal pronouns.
Hey! Here are some examples
of personal pronouns.
Hey! Can you find
the personal pronouns?
I would like
some water please.
I. I’m talking
about me. Right? I.
Sally said, “Hey!
You really must visit
the new museum.
Sally said.
“You.” There’s your
personal pronoun.
He congratulated me on
my recent promotion.
“He.”
“He” is your personal pronoun.
Sally said,
she was going
to the cinema later.
“She.”
Is your personal pronoun.
Hey! Where is the key?
I can’t find it anywhere.
Where is the key?
“I” is your personal pronoun.
Hey! We could go to the beach
this weekend. “We.”
“We” is your personal pronoun.
They’re coming
for dinner tonight,
aren’t they?
“They.”
is your personal pronoun.
I can’t visit you on Saturday.
I have to work.
“I” is your personal pronoun.
You could visit me on
Sunday, couldn’t you?
That is a question
tag, by the way,
and I brought up
my intonation just
a little bit,
because it was
about the future.
We don’t always know
about the future. But,
I want to take just
one second here and
explain a little bit about
question tags.
If I said; “Hey!
You could visit me
on Sunday, couldn’t you?
You see how I brought
my intonation down?
Be careful with
question marks,
when you see them in sentences.
The question is.
Is it a true question or not?
If it’s not a true question
because I know,
then your intonation
should stay neutral or
come down. So.
If I don’t know.
Hey! You could visit me on
Sunday, couldn’t you?
You see how I brought
my question up?
That’s because, I really don’t know.
You could
visit me on Sunday,
couldn’t you?
You see how I brought
my intonation down
just a little bit
and that’s because
I’m asking you
a real question.
Maybe because I already know
the answer!
Hey! Have you seen Bob?
He’s usually at work
by now. So. He.
I could say;
Hey! Have you seen Bob?
Bob is usually
at work by now.
Now you understand
why we normally use pronouns.
So. That we don’t repeat
some of the same words
in the previous statement.
Hey! Could you call
Irene for me?
She should be home
by now.
“She.”
Irene and “she.”
So. We have two
statements here
and in each statement,
I have the same.
I have a similar
statement. Right?
Could you call Irene?
Because why? Well.
She should be home by now.
I took “Irene” out
and I put in “she.”
If I said;
Could you call “Irene”
for me?
“Irene” should be home by now!
You see how I put
in the pronoun? Because,
it helps us talk
about something without repeating
the previous information.
Hey! The computer isn’t
working now it must
be broken.
I could say; The computer
isn’t working now.
The computer must
be broken.
That sounds silly. Right?
Of course it does. So.
In this statement,
I took the word
computer and in
the second statement I
put in the word “it.”
You and I
could make the movie if
we left now. Ah.
To make a movie.
It doesn’t mean
to create.
In this case, it means
“to watch”
and we’re going to watch
a movie tonight.
We can make it,
if we left now.
They’ll call me
any time.
What should I tell
them. Right? So.
I don’t know, who these
people are, but you
probably do, because
that’s why I used
“they and them.”
“Subject, object”
pronouns are;
“You, it and one.”
“Subject pronouns” are;
“I, you, he, she, it,
we, they and one.
“Object pronouns” are;
“Me, you, him, her,
it, us, them and one.