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What are Stative Verbs? Grammar Review Video

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Video English LessonsWhat are Stative Verbs? Grammar Review.

Stative verbs refer to a state, not an action. Stative verbs are used to refer to facts without movement or motion.

Most stative verbs are never used in the continuous tenses.

Be careful! There are exceptions! Just ask yourself one simple question! Can I see it happening? Can I see a physical action. If not, it most likely is a “Stative verb.”

Other terminology used is “State verbs and Static verbs.”

The Following are Stative Verb Examples:

I understand everything you have said!

You have a cold right now, don’t you?

We didn’t recognize her in her new car!

They appreciate everything we do for them!

He agrees with you on that project!

She measures success with profit she earns!

It weighs more than it did six months ago!

I like the fact that you are a happy person!

You love your wife and everyone knows it!

We always enjoy going to the movies! “Going as a Gerund.”

They are enjoying the party tonight!

He is having dinner at his mothers house Friday!

She is seeing her doctor Tuesday at three o’clock!

It will satisfy the loan payment!

You will notice a few state verbs used in the continuous. There are exceptions that you should study.

Some stative verbs used in the continuous are “Have, see, be, taste, feel, smell, look.” There are more! Ask your teacher for stative verb exceptions to help you.

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Stative Verbs Everyday Dialog.

Stative Verbs are used
to refer to facts without
movement or motion.
Generally speaking. Yes?
Most stative verbs
are never used
in the continuous tenses.
Be careful.
There are exceptions
to that rule.
Just ask yourself one
simple question.
Can I see it happening?
Can I see a physical
action of some kind?
If not, it’s most likely
a stative verb.
Other terminology used
for stative verbs are
state verbs and static verbs.
We use three different
terminologies for
stative verbs.
Hey! Stative verb examples.
Here we go!
Can you find the state verbs?
I understand everything
you have said.
To understand.
“Understand” is a stative verb.
And you can’t see an action.
Can you?
Ah! Let me try. Well.
No. I can’t. I’m thinking, thinking,
I can’t see an action,
when I describe this
with the word “understand.”
“You have a cold, right now.
Don’t you? You see?
I can see that, by the way.
That’s a question tag.
Another favorite part of
English. Don’t you?
This is a question tag
or tag question.
And I can see that
you have a cold.
So. Be careful with
the question mark
and this is why
I tell early learners
of English to be careful
with question tags.
Because most students
at the very early stages,
learn question marks
and the intonation. Yes?
The intonation goes up
with a question mark, but
in this particular case,
it’s not true.
The right way to phrase
or to make this statement would be.
“Ah! You have a cold right now,
don’t you?”
You see? Because I can see.
Maybe you’re sneezing.
“aaachoo” or
you are, I can see that you
have a cold.
You have a fever.
Something like that.
So. Be careful with
question tags.
“We didn’t recognize
her in her new car.”
Recognize.
To recognize. You see?
I can’t see an action. Can I?
“They appreciate everything
we do for them.”
There’s two state verbs here.
“Appreciate” and “do.” So.
“Do” is an empty verb.
We’re using it to help
describe, explain.
“Appreciate.”
To appreciate, is a stative verb.
“He agrees with you
on that project.” So.
“To agree.”
That is a state verb.
I would not use that
in the continuous. For sure.
I can’t say:
I am “agreeing” with you.
Technically, with English
grammar rules, I can’t do that.
But I need to tell you
that sometimes we do.
I could say;
I’ve been “agreeing” with
you all day.
Let’s make a decision. So.
It’s not perfect English.
But, it’s one of those words
that is an exception
to the general rule for
state verbs.
There are many verbs that we
use as exceptions with “-ing”
and the continuous
even though,
the rule, the general rule,
says we don’t use
state verbs or
stative verbs in
continuous tenses.
“She measures success with
profit she earned”. So.
“To measure.”
That one, I might be able
to see if someone’s
physically doing it.
I am measuring
water now.
For my new recipe
in the kitchen.
Something like that.
But in this case,
success doesn’t allow me
to do that. So.
She measures
success with profit.
She earns.
This is simply a fact.
It’s not an action.
It weighs more
than it did
six months ago.
Again, “to weigh.”
How much does
the new cat,
the new dog weigh? Right?
And in this context,
it’s not an action for sure.
I like the fact that
you are a happy person.
And I’m just. It’s funny
because I’ve just described my wife.
She is always so
happy! Right, Larisa?
Okay. [Laugh]
“Like” is a state verb.
One of my favorite verbs.
It’s kind of like very.
I am very, very, very happy.
Try not to do that.
Learn new vocabulary.
In place of very, very, very.
“Like” is actually used
seven different ways
in the English language. So.
Look that up in your dictionary.
“You love your wife and
everyone knows it!”
Of course I do.
“Love” is a state verb.
By the way.
“Hey! We always enjoy
going to the movies.”
So. “Going” here is
used as a gerund.
“To go.”
But, you see that
verb “enjoy”?
“Enjoy” as a stative verb.
And I use the
verb “go”
after enjoy.
I put “-ing” with it,
because now it’s
not a verb.
Remember, in English,
one easy way
generally, to determine
if it’s a verb or not,
in the continuous. Yes?
I am going.
I was going.
I will be going.
What did you notice
about each sentence?
Each sentence
had the verb
“to be.”
So. In order to create
continuous tenses,
we must have the verb “to be.”
If you do not
see the verb “to be”
you’re having trouble
with your English
trying to figure out
state verbs and
so forth and gerunds.
Look for the verb “to be.”
If it’s not in the sentence,
it’s not going to be a verb.
And especially if it is
after a state
verb like “enjoy.”
Something like that.
“They are enjoying
the party tonight.”
Now. They are
enjoying the party.
Hey! Look at everybody.
They are enjoying the party.
Now what do you see?
I use the verb “to be” here
they are. Yes?
“I am, he is, she is,
it is, they are, you are,”
Enjoying.
Enjoy!
“Like.”
“Like,” by the way,
is not to be used in a
continuous. Unless.
You. Never, but,
“Liking” is a noun as well.
I have a liking for pizza.
In that context.
“Liking” is a noun.
Not a verb.
Do not use “like”
with “-ing” as a verb.
“Enjoy” is a stative verb
and it’s often used
in the continuous
when something is
happening over time. So.
Hey! I really can’t say,
“I enjoy this
party very much.”
I might do that,
but it’s not the best English.
We are enjoying this
party, so much!
You see? So.
That’s one of your exceptions.
“He is having dinner at
his mother’s house
Friday.” Well.
“To have.”
“Have” is a state verb.
And this is in the continuous.
He is having dinner.
“Have” is a state verb.
Again and with “-ing” and
the verb “To Be”
this is continuous.
But, this is more
used as a fact,
than it is an action.
“She is seeing
her doctor
Tuesday at 3:00.
Now. This is an interesting one.
because “To see” is
one of the
sense verbs. Right?
I see you.
I hear you.
I touch.
Things like that.
But in this context,
she is “seeing” her
doctor or she has
a doctor’s appointment.
Something like that.
To see the doctor.
Another one,
that’s another exception,
with stative verbs.
It will satisfy
the loan payment.
In other words, I’m making the
final payment.
This will finish my
loan agreement.
Now. I don’t have to make
payments anymore.
To satisfy.
Again, that’s not an action.
It is a verb.
It is a stative verb.
You’ll notice, a few
state verbs used
in the continuous.
I did that on purpose
to help you with
some of the exceptions.
Let’s do a fast review.
I’m “having” a party
tomorrow. Can you come?
That’s in the continuous.
It’s not an action.
It’s a fact.
I’m “seeing” the
doctor tomorrow.
Not really.
It was a few months ago.
Hey! Bill is being silly!
We do that.
“Be” can be use
with “-ing” if we’re talking
about something that’s happening now.
“Tasting.”
Hey? What are you doing right now?
Well, I’m tasting.
I’m tasting the soup.
Maybe the borscht. Yes?
If you live in another country.
“Feel.”
How do you feel now?
That’s an interesting one
because I can use that
as a state verb
without “-ing” or with.
I am feeling
fine right now.
Thank you for asking.
Hey! Smell. Right?
I have been smelling
that delicious dinner
for an hour.
You see?
Or, I smell dinner.
Let’s eat!
Look. Hey! What are you
doing right now? Well
I’m looking for my pen.
I am looking.
To look. Yes?
Can you help me look
for my pen?
Or, I am looking.
Oh! There it is.
I found my pen.