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What are Empty Verbs? Grammar Review.

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What are Empty Verbs? Grammar Review!

Empty verbs perform a few different jobs in English. In simple terms, empty verbs replace other verbs. Empty verbs are used as part of a phrase as well. Native English speakers often convey the same message two different ways. What are Empty Verbs? Grammar Review.

Common empty verbs are “Have, give, take, make, do, get.”

As empty verbs have no meaning, they are commonly used to help describe certain activities.

Collocated word combinations use certain empty verbs to explain or describe an action or fact.

Here are Empty Verb Examples!

I am having a party Friday! Planning or to schedule.

You have a car! You own a car.

We have coffee in the mornings! We drink coffee.

They gave me an award! They awarded me.

He gives blood at the hospital! He donates blood.

She gave me a sandwich! She served me a sandwich.

It takes great photos! The camera works well.

I take a bath every night! I bathe every night.

You need to make up your mind! To decide.

We made a complaint at the shop! To complain.

They did some shopping! They went shopping or they shopped.

He does the cooking every night! He cooks or prepares dinner.

She does yoga three times a week! To practice yoga.

It gets excited at feeding time! To be happy.

The examples express just a few ideas.

Empty verbs should be studied and learned with simple examples and everyday English. Phrases are full of empty verbs.

Remember that phrases can be both literal and idiomatic. In other words, literal phrases often describe an action or state. What are Empty Verbs? Grammar Review.

Idiomatic phrases or idiomatic phrasal verbs describe a state or action that is not obvious most of the time.

Have fun with empty verbs.

Empty Verbs Everyday Dialog!

What are empty verbs?
Well, empty verbs
perform a few different
jobs in English.
Simple terms.
Empty verbs replace
other verbs. That’s it!
Simple terms.
Empty verbs are used
as part of
phrases as well.
Native English speakers often
say the same thing twice.
And this is why we need
empty verbs.
Common empty verbs are;
“Have,” “give,”
“take,” “make,”
“do,” and “get.”
There are more.
But these are very
common in the English language.
Empty verbs have
no meaning at all.
You must use them in
context with other statements.
Other words.
Collocated word combinations.
Use empty verbs to
explain or describe an action
or fact. So.
What is a collocation?
Well, a collocation is
two or more words
put together
in everyday English.
There may or may not
be a reason for that.
Here are some empty
verb examples
can you find them?
I’m “having” a
party Friday. So.
I’m having. Right?
“Have” is an empty verb.
One fun part of this is
we often use empty verbs
in place of literal verbs.
That we might better understand.
Early learners of English
often don’t learn how to use.
Let’s say.
The word “have” in
the continuous because it’s a
state verb.
And so, most students
learn the word “have.”
I have a phone.
I have a car.
I have a wife.
I have two cats.
“I have.” Yes? So.
“I have.” but, and,
Because it’s a “state verb.”
The students are taught that
“have” is a state verb.
Not to be used in
the continuous
because it’s a state verb.
It’s not true because
it is an exception
to the general rule. So.
I am having a party Friday.
And the fun part I wanted
to tell you about is if
you take out the word “having”
often we can put in
a another word.
Another verb that
better explains or
describes more
specifically instead of
using an empty verb.
So. If I said to you.
Hey! I’m “planning” a
party Friday.
Can you come?
Hey! I am “scheduling”
a party on Friday.
Can you come?
Those also work
Those are literal
verbs instead of
an empty verb.
Like “have.”
You have a car.
Well, it means the same as
you own a car.
I might say
the same thing twice.
Hey! You “own” a car.
I didn’t know you “have” a car.
You see?
Sometimes in spoken English,
native speakers will often say
the same thing twice,
and they will substitute
an empty verb
after the literal verb.
We “have” coffee
in the mornings.
It means we “drink”
coffee in the mornings.
Hey! I “drink” coffee
in the mornings.
I like “having.”
I can do that.
I like having coffee.
They “give” me.
They “gave”
me an award, or
They “awarded” me
with an award.
Now. You can see
clearly, why I didn’t
use the word “awarded”
in my first statement.
Because very often,
we know that most
nouns can be used
as verbs and many
verbs can be a noun. So.
In this context.
They gave me an award
is perfect English.
They “awarded” me
with an “award.”
Probably not the best English
because I used a word
twice and it sounds
funny doesn’t it?
He gives blood
at the hospital.
I can certainly do that.
But if we want to talk
about a true collocation.
Two words that are really
common in the
English language.
The word “donate”
with blood
is very,
very common and we,
most of the time, use
the word “donate.”
Hey! I often donate blood,
at the blood bank,
or the hospital.
I can also use
“give” in place
of “donate” because you
understand me. Right?
You understand what I’m saying.
She “gave” me
a sandwich, or
She “served” me
a sandwich. So.
Would you like a sandwich?
Yes I would. Here you go.
I’m “giving” you a
sandwich now. Or. I am
“serving” you a sandwich.
It’s another fun
part of English.
When you first start teaching
English
to ESL students,
one of the things
that you try
and do, is help students
with both the literal definition
and empty verbs as well.
Because they literally mean
the same thing.
It “takes” great photos.
It means the camera
works well.
“Take” a photo.
“To take” a photo.
Many students confuse
“make” and “take.” Right? So.
To take a photo.
To take photos.
That is a true collocation.
We don’t use “make” with
photos unless you’re
maybe doing something in
the editing room.
Something like that. But.
To go out and click, click. Yes?
To “take” a photo.
“Take” and “photo”
is the perfect collocation.
I “take” a bath
every night.
The funny part
of this English, is that
most students will
probably learn
how to make this
statement with “take,”
before they
learn the word “bathe.”
That word is “bathe.”
Not “bath.”
“A bath” is
something that we can
sit in.
A “bathtub” for instance.
Or. I am “taking”
a bath.
“A” is your
indefinite article. Right?
“A” bath. So.
“Bath” is a noun.
Not a verb. But.
If we want to describe that
with a verb,
with the natural verb,
we would use
the verb to “bathe”
not “bath.”
“To bathe.” So.
I “bathe” every night
and, certainly
my friends, relatives and
wife are very happy about that.
And you can. So.
“To bathe” or
“to take” a bath,
is an expression or collocation.
You need to “make up”
your mind.
You need to “decide.”
So. We can take out,
“make up.”
“Make” again as your
empty verb.
“Up” is a
in this context
“up” would be
an adverb.
If we’re talking about an
action or climbing it’s
probably a preposition.
“To make up your mind.”
“Make up” is a phrase.
We “made a complaint”
at the shop.
Or. I could say;
We “complained”
at the shop.
So. You see where we
made a “complaint”
or we “complained.”
They did some shopping.
Or. They went shopping.
You see?
So. I can do either one.
They’re both perfect English.
And I might say,
the same thing twice.
One with a literal.
One with the empty verb.
I could say;
“Hey! We went shopping
last night.”
We did a lot of shopping.
Let me tell you! So.
I did shopping.
We did shopping or
we shopped.
They mean the same thing.
He does the “cooking”
every night.
He cooks or
“prepares” dinner. So.
I could say:
He cooks,
she “cooks”
every night, or
She “prepares” dinner
every night. You see?
Those all work the same way.
She “does” yoga
three times a week. Or.
She “practices” yoga.
To have exercise
of some kind. Now.
Yoga is a funny one
because “do” is
very common when we
talk about that activity. So.
I “do” yoga.
She “does” yoga
three times a week.
Probably better than
“practice” in this case.
It gets “excited” at
feeding time. Or.
“To be happy” So.
Our little cat.
Our cat is
“very happy” at
feeding time. Or.
It gets “excited” at
feeding time.
They both work
exactly the same way.
Empty verbs should be
studied and learned with
simple examples.
And everyday English.
Phrases are also
full of empty verbs.
Remember that phrases
can both be
literal and idiomatic.
In other words,
literal phrases often
describe an action or state.
Idiomatic phrases or
idiomatic phrasal verbs,
describe a “State or Action.” What are Empty Verbs? Grammar Review

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